"I aim to provoke and probe people perceptions of clothing. For instance this collection is made from food bi-products, other wise waste, making it edible so that the body can dispose of it, avoiding landfill and giving the body nutrition. The materials are also re-meltable and re-mold-able so there is never any need to wear the same dress twice." - Emily Crane

"I aim to provoke and probe people perceptions of clothing. For instance this collection is made from food bi-products, other wise waste, making it edible so that the body can dispose of it, avoiding landfill and giving the body nutrition. The materials are also re-meltable and re-mold-able so there is never any need to wear the same dress twice." - Emily Crane

The above video is about a designer, Emily Crane, who uses gelatine, seaweed extracts and edible foaming agents to make her one of a kind dresses and accessories. When asked how she got from a food-based mixture to a wearable garment of piece of jewelry, Crane states, “The key is the process. Most of my wearable pieces are recipes that are mixed, set and come out of the freezer and are either dried or worn until the wearer is wanting to eat them or remix and reform the materials to create a constant new.”

As I was reading an article about a large greenhouse being planned for a Brooklyn rooftop, this video was shown. According to Bright Farms, “Sure, the more futuristic versions of vertical farming may still be pie in the sky, but given that airports are even growing food indoors these days, we shouldn’t be too surprised to see farms appearing on our rooftops too”. Who knows, perhaps the future of food will be sprouting from the tops of skyscrapers in big cities.

Seasonal Ingredient Map

Throughout our class discussions, we have talked about seasonal foods. Click the above link to see what foods are in season, state by state!

A Bug’s World?


In Jill Ettinger’s article Bugs: The Future of Food, she proposes that the near future will be served with a palate of insects and bugs. In other countries, bugs have been labeled as a delicacies and are consumed on a daily basis.

In a recent edition of the Wall Street Journal, entomologists studying insects for human food consumption stated, “Raising insects for food would avoid many of the problems associated with livestock.” They suggest that insects, which are cold-blooded, require less feed than cows and pigs who turn food into energy to maintain body temperatures. Yields are greater, too. Bugs require less water than animals, and ten pounds of feed can raise six pounds of insect meat compared to just one pound of beef. Ettinger continues to discuss how farming insects are also more humane than raising animals. She concludes with stating that perhaps someday chefs will be farming their own “nutty-tasting crunchy insect ‘meat’ right in the restaurant, giving new meaning to the term local grub.”

(Source: stumbleupon.com)

Glasner discusses how Starbucks is never used as an example for making America fat partly because it is labeled as “expensive and classy” (183). The above photo is of a high selling holiday drink from Starbucks that apparently contains 579 calories, which is about 50 more than a McDonald’s Big Mac.  The Starbucks Venti Eggnog Latte costs roughly around $6.00 and exceeds the daily saturated fat amount for women.  Although I am not a fan of McDonald’s, I think I might opt for the Big Mac…

Glasner discusses how Starbucks is never used as an example for making America fat partly because it is labeled as “expensive and classy” (183). The above photo is of a high selling holiday drink from Starbucks that apparently contains 579 calories, which is about 50 more than a McDonald’s Big Mac. The Starbucks Venti Eggnog Latte costs roughly around $6.00 and exceeds the daily saturated fat amount for women. Although I am not a fan of McDonald’s, I think I might opt for the Big Mac…